Tag Archive | Cycling

Cycle Smart International 2015 – Cat 4 Women Photos

I got access to my gf’s camera and wanted to share a few photos from the Women’s Cat 4 Women’s race in Northampton last weekend.  Some are of me–others of teammates or other riders from the category.  Enjoy!

Catching a little air!

Catching a little air!








Racing for Last

DC & CX 051

This Saturday I’m racing after a 4 week break. My training has been nil but when I have found the time to ride I have felt pretty good. Despite a Cat 4 / Citizen race being available, I signed up for the Open category (1/2/3/4). According to Crossresults I’m predicted to place last among the current competition, which includes Elite women. Am I bothered? No.

So why did I chose the slaughter? Lot of reasons. Let’s review:

1.)  I’m not going to win at this sport. Ever. There is only one winner. If I entered the Cat 4 race, I wouldn’t win that one either. I’m ok with where I end up among the faster women.

2.) Night Weasels taught me, chasing pros makes me perform better. OK–it’s usually when they’ve just lapped me, but it does provoke a response from me, and that makes my entire race faster. I also like watching the lines they take. Teachable moments.

3.) I’d rather race for 45 minutes instead of 30, especially when I’m driving 2 hours to get there. I mean, these 30 minute races leave me a bit wanting. It’s not enough. If I have an opportunity to go for longer, I will.

4.) Points. Even in last, my points for this race will be low, which will help me getting placed for a better starting position at a future race.

5.) I’m not a beginner. Hey I know I’m not fast, and not fast enough to have upgraded to Cat 3 without me writing to USA Cycling and requesting it, but I know what I’m doing. I am comfortable dismounting and remounting and shouldering and will yield to a faster rider. I know I won’t get in anyone’s way and would never forgive myself if I did.

So–a little humility is necessary. I have never placed last in a cyclocross race, but this weekend, It’s extremely probable that I will. But it’s important to remember, even when you accept that you’re not as fast as the rest, that anything can happen in a cross race.  Anything. It’s a sport rife with unpredictables. So never count your chickens, because a hell of a lot of things can hatch in 45 minutes on a cyclocross course.


When you can’t ride or race, blog about riding and racing


I’m 3 weeks into October and as expected, my ability to get out and ride my bike has gone into serious decline. This happens every year, but I never am able to let myself off the hook for it. Work and my son’s school schedule + extra-circulars ramp up, daylight ramps down, and not a lot of time is left for me. The timing sucks if you love cyclocross. Adulting is a lot of work.

Last week I intended on racing. I decided not to. Partly because I was seriously jet lagged from my business trip to Portland, and partly because I couldn’t work out an arrangement for a little extra time on Sunday before my son returned home. Since I hadn’t been out on the bike much and everything felt like work, I just decided to play.

Saturday I picked a spot near the Quabbin Reservoir that I’ve not been to, and decided to go exploring with the ‘cross bike. It’s peak foliage season, and I was out for almost 3 hours, 2 of them actually riding, taking pictures of stone walls and the gorgeous scenery, riding rocky fire roads, climbing through farmlands and enjoying the full throttle colors of autumn.

Sunday I had less time, and it was even colder.  It was in the high 30’s and I headed out to do some mountain biking. Mountain biking demands so much more attention, which helped me not think about work and some of the less fun aspects of adulting.  I got a little lost, which stressed me out a bit, and came across a Canadian couple hiking. They tried to direct me, and adorably, ended up bickering with one another as to whether or not I could ride over Hitchcock Mountain.

The woman: “That trail is not one you can take a bike on,” she cautioned.

The man: “Look at those tires,” he said pointing to my front wheel, “of course she can go up that trail!”

I headed back from where I came, went in a circle, and finally found a trail I recognized. I love to explore, I don’t like feeling lost. Light snow started to fall and it rustled the leaves with a chorus of tiny taps and rattles on the freshly fallen leaves. I labored up the side of the Holyoke Range, climbing almost 1200 ft in just 7.5 miles.

I’m remembering these weekend rides to sustain me through another intense work week. I have not been on the bike and don’t see it happening again until Saturday at least. I need to start back on doing sprints in my workouts, and getting my heart rate back into gear, and I won’t be racing again this weekend due to childcare again. This October break will be longer than I planned, but I’m planning a November surge….

I signed up for Paradise Frenzy Cyclocross in Vermont next weekend for Halloween. I heard from Heather it’s a great course–one that I’d love.  After that will be Northampton–2 days of racing and a “local” race which means I don’t have to drive a bunch that weekend (win). Then I’ll likely do Cheshire CX again, especially if I can talk Laura into driving up from NY for it.  Then–we will see.  Ice Weasels is scheduled, and it’s on a weekend I’m free, so I’d like to so that race as well. Anything after Northampton is just the icing on the cake anyway.

So there is my mid-season ramble about the woes of not riding.  Hopefully I can get a break and purge some of this extra energy I have with a  good long ride.


Putney Cider House Classic MTB Race-Flatted but Finished

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I’ve always said my first love is mountain biking. It’s where I started, and I really wish I did more of it. So when a nearby Root 66 race was scheduled on a day in my schedule that I was actually available, I signed up for the Cat 3 women’s slot.  A MTB race in southern Vermont was not a hard sell.

Joined by co-blogger Heather, we arrived nice & early, signed in and warmed up. We started on a mowed track through a meadow and into the woods. The climbing started early, and the trails were flowy, fun, with easy to navigate roots and rocks sprinkled throughout the course. There was plenty of downhill as well, with most of the course on singletrack, occasionally breaking out into doubletrack which provided opportunities to pass.

Since I didn’t pre-ride–I really had no idea what to expect and I rode conservatively for the first lap. The climbing pushed me physically–it wasn’t too awful but it made me work. The lap was supposed to be 5ish miles, but my Garmin read 4 miles and I had finished the first lap. I was pumped!

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1 to go and psyched!

Lap 2 and I started to open it up. I caught air on one of the downhills. I shredded the banked turns. The climbing felt easier. I knew I was close to one of the riders just ahead of me. I thought I might catch her. But mostly, I was just really engaged in the ride–which was awesome.

Soon after beginning lap 2 when my mood was so high, I felt my back rim kiss a rooty section. Then I felt it again over a few rocks. I stood up, riding out of the saddle to keep my weight off the rear wheel. “I better watch that tire,” I thought. I lasted about a mile before descending down a fast double track, turning into a grassy turn and the tube was done. The tire nearly rolled completely off the rim as I hit the grass.


So, keep going. I dismounted and trotted with the bike, pushing it back up the singletrack. I was determined to finish–I did not want a DNF. And even if I wanted to quit (which i didn’t), there was no way I was getting out of the woods without following the trail out.  I ran what I could, lifted the bike over the rougher stuff as to not damage the rim. 3 miles, or thereabouts. The lead I had over the 2 women behind me dissolved.  in 15 minutes from my flat they overtook me. A few guys came by and asked if I was OK. Reports trickled to the finish line that there was a Cat 3 women with a mechanical on the course. When Heather heard that, she said “That’s Karen.” Of course it was. I finished with a smile anyway.


I was a bit bummed out–but then again, I wasn’t. I got a great workout pushing my mountain bike all that way. I watched my heart rate the whole time and kept it high. I had a wonderful slice of apple pie and a glass of hard cider afterwards. And I was happy to be in Vermont, a place a fall more in love with each time I go.

So I finished last. I had a good time. I gave a good effort and flats happen. I got a race under my belt before cyclocross season begins. I hung out with friends. I got back to Vermont. All good stuff. I do hope that the rest of my races stay mechanically uneventful, but hey–anything can happen….its my first flat in a race so I was due. Happens to the best of us, right? Next time I’ll bring my CO2.


My New Cyclocross Race Season Schedule Strategy


The next couple months are going to be crazy.

As summer winds down, cyclocross season kicks off, and my schedule goes into overdrive. My calendar runneth over with races, and not just cyclocross races. This is what I’m currently planning for the next 6 weeks….

  • Sunday 8/23  Putney Cider House Classic MTB Race – Putney, VT
  • Saturday 8/29  CompEdge CX @ Forest Park – Springfield, MA
  • Sunday 8/30  Boston Spartan Sprint – Barre, MA
  • Saturday 9/12 Aetna Silk City Cyclocross – Manchester. CT
  • Saturday 9/19 The Dude Smash – West Warwick, RI
  • Saturday 9/19 White Park Cyclocross – Concord, NH
  • Sat & Sun 9/26-27 Gran Prix of Gloucester – Gloucester, MA
  • Wednesday 9/30 The Night Weasels Cometh – Shrewsbury, MA
  • Saturday & Sun 10/3-4 The KMC Providence Cyclocross Festival – Providence, RI (one of these days, not sure yet).

Then I have a business trip for the better part of a week to the west coast in mid October. That will really screw up my fitness. I plan of trying to race every other weekend in October, but I’m not sure which ones and the particulars of my schedule that far in the future. I want to stay in good fighting shape for Cycle-Smart International November 7-8 in Northampton, and after that–well everything is gravy.

Don't forget to enjoy yourself this cyclocross season!

Don’t forget to enjoy yourself this cyclocross season!

I’ve really changed my expectations this year. I used to stress about racing well every single race. That’s not realistic. And I used to think I could keep up the pace through December. That’s also not realistic. I just don’t have the space in my schedule for that. But I can use the summer to build a good base and go into September in pretty decent shape, This year, I’m riding almost twice as much as I did last year (at this time). I had to work really hard to make that happen within the confines of my schedule. Last summer I was job hunting, and my focus was on my professional development. I was feeling a lot of conflict trying to ride well and also pursue life’s priorities. As a result, I had a relatively crappy season. This year, I tried to ride more often, rest deliberately, and dabbled with HR training.

Now I know-(I know) I’m a 40+ mom with a full time job and while my athleticism is holding up relatively well, I’m not 20, or 25, or 30, or even 35 anymore. I’m very competitive in spirit–I always want to do well for me, and I’m getting better at accepting that while I can get faster, I will never be fast. I know what I’m good at (technical, sketchy, mountain-bikey terrain) and I know what I’m not (steep hills, speed, extreme heat). So my strategy this year is to go into the season relatively fit, dial it in after the first couple of races, then go hard. Try to rebound after mid October’s known setback of a week of travel, and then punch it again at the end of October and Early November. Then I will chill. I’ll race when I can but won’t feel guilty or like I’m not a real athlete for not committing every weekend through December to CX. I love the sport, but I have to keep life balanced.

My goals remain:  Have a ton of fun, give my best effort, stay upright, try not to DNF, finish mid pack when I can, and enjoy the cyclocross community.

See you at the races,


Get Ready! #CXisComing Tips, Course Insights, and Race Advice


For anyone racing cross this season, I’m attempting to gather up details to help you all prep for upcoming racing in New England. I’ll use course descriptions, photos, personal experience, and link to any published content (including video) I can get my hands on. If you have any resources you’d like to share, please comment, tweet, or email me. Get in touch!  We’re all in this sport together. If you are new to cyclocross doing your homework can help you mentally prepare for each race. Get ready! #CxisComing!


Why is this information important?

While weather is often the most reliable influencer of course conditions, each course has characteristics and features that unless you’ve already raced there, you may not be prepared for. When Gloucester is dry it gets incredibly dusty with loose stones. Northampton has essentially two sections:  one up on the hill and one flat twisty, grassy drag race. Quad Cross is great for anyone with solid mountain biking skills. Blunt Park has been described as a grass crit.

Should I attend a cyclocross clinic?

Absolutely. And as many as possible. You cannot get enough of these, really. If you didn’t get a chance to sign up for the KIT clinic with the amazing Mo Bruno Roy or attend Cross Camp with Adam Myerson, attend one of the many local clinics on BikeReg.  You can also go on the weekly group cx ride, where practice makes perfect…


Should I watch videos of previous races on the course?

Yes! Some of them can make you dizzy with motion sickness, but the quality improves every year. A good video can show you what it’s like to race in a group, what a crash looks like close up, it can show you the twists, turns, hills, barriers, and other features of a course and allow you to mentally pre-ride the course. This allows you to anticipate terrain and plan your strategy. It’s like game tape for cross racers. There aren’t videos of every race, and beware of courses that have changed over the years (some remain the same year after year, some change often to keep it fresh).  Always check the description on BikeReg to see if there have been any changes made to a race course.

Should I watch cyclocross videos in general?

Yes! An especially good series is called Svenness from CXhairs.com. Discussed are conditions, tire selection, technique, strategy. It’s an excellent analysis and gets you into the mental game behind race tactics. And please check out Behind the Barriers TV, created by Jeremy Powers. There is some excellent video there from last season and while they will not have the same content in 2015, it is an extremely valuable resource.

Does watching course videos mean I can skip pre-riding the course?

No. Always budget time to pre-ride in addition to watching video. I’ve missed pre-rides and it’s cost me. A few laps, even a slow trolling pace can be the intelligence gathering difference that can mean several places in your race results.

Should I check the weather?

Like a worried mother, yes, check the weather. This will greatly influence clothing and tire selection.

What is the best way to really prepare for a cyclocross race?

Honestly, the best way to prepare for a race is to race. Each race prepares you for the next. You will make mistakes, learn new things, meet new folks, Race, rinse, repeat. Experience is the best teacher!

Good luck, have fun, and Happy Cx!


Twitter:  @sipclipandgo

My Race Results Aren’t Pro, But My New Kit Is!

Just about the only thing that comes close to new bike day is new kit day, and today was that day!    The grassroots cyclocross team I have joined for the 2015 season is Keep It Tight, or KIT for short. The kit for the team is sharp, with an awesome color combo that pops just right. I received my jersey and bibs, along with a cx skin suit in the mail today and despite the rainy forecast, I suited up and demoed it around town. Made by Craft, it has a very euro fit. I sized up on the bottoms and should have sized up on the top. The pad in the bibs is legit….not too thin or flimsy, but not so stiff and big that you feel like you are sitting on a stack of cardboard. I still need to take it on a long ride, but on my short ride tonight it had all the makings of the goldilocks of chamois pads.   I’m looking forward to meeting some of my teammates, and to the cyclocross season, which will be here before we know it.  Until then, I need to work on “keeping it tight” and trying to race as good as my new kit looks.



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