Road to Improvement


The Finish Line at Gloucester’s Gran Prix 2012.

I took 2 whole days off the bike after Northampton’s CSIcx race weekend.  It’s amazing how 45 minutes of racing can leave you destroyed.  Two days in a row, I tapped out, needing the break.

When I entered that race weekend, I thought that this might be how I end the chapter of this freshmen effort in the sport of cyclocross.  But I was selling my new addiction short.

I registered for a small race in Connecticut for next weekend. Last year only 10 women raced in total.  They have a breakout category for just Cat 4 women this year, which may mean they are expecting a larger turnout.  At any rate, I’ll be racing with the Cat 1-4, but scored as a Cat 4.  I’m interested to see how that looks.  I was really pleased with my results at Northampton.  I felt I made very solid efforts and my placement–while nothing to write home about–had improved from a similar race (Providence).  In Providence, I was 63rd, in Northampton, 52 and 55th.  And while I realize it’s not an identical crowd, identical course, identical conditions or identical size field.  It is similar enough in all those regards that I feel a 11 placement improvement is well, an improvement.

Other things I have noticed in this pursuit:  I started playing women’s pickup hoops again this year.  Last year, my lungs burned and I poured sweat, red in the face and gasping trying to run a full court game for 90 minutes.  This year, I was up and down that court faster than ever, and I didn’t feel fatigued at all.  I was also sinking a few baskets this time, which was a nice switch.

To top it off, yesterday I went back to the ‘cross practice course that I am so lucky to have access to.  There is one other woman on Strava who has indexed this course in her workouts.  I’ve never met her but she is a friend of Heather’s and she races ‘cross and mountain bikes and does pretty well–considerably better than me.  When I first started doing laps at Ed’s farm I was a good 2 minutes off her time.  After yesterday, I have reduced it to 30 seconds.  And I know she has been going back there and improved upon her personal best as well.  It’s a stretch to think I could close down that gap entirely, but I wasn’t going full throttle yesterday, just keeping it a consistent effort and working on being efficient–so I know there is still time to carve off.

Not making mistakes on the course carves time.  Getting faster and stronger carves time.  Building endurance carves time.  Knowing your bicycle well enough that it is starts to become an extension of you carves time.  Skills work carves time.  Staying healthy carves time.  Staying lean and light carves time.  I am starting to see the moving parts, the art of improvement, the finer points of chance and luck and very hard work.

Cheshire CX (that small race in CT) is next weekend and I will finish toward the end of the pack.  I will score higher points because it’s a smaller race. That will help me get a better starting position for another race. Which will also carve time.

Negotiating these tight turns is another skill to practice to carve time. Gloucester Gran Prix, 2012. Women’s Elite.

Cyclocross races might only be 40 or 45 minutes long, but the game is a long one.  The effort that you put in day after day, each race is another stepping stone, each barrier, each muddy turn–each of these things are small factors that go into the larger result.  But what supersedes all of these things is the biggest, most important point of cyclocross.  It’s just really, really fun.  It’s really hard, really intense and incredibly fun.  It does not matter where you place, it matters that you are out there, shivering in the cold and mud and under modified sunlight pushing yourself and your bike as hard as possible.  This is an optimal medium for self discovery, and the person you race hardest against is yourself.

-Karen

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About Karen

When I was 10, I used to think I was the bionic woman.

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